Jake Brownscombe, PhD candidate

BTT.Jake_.Brownscombe2 Jake’s research examines behavioural ecology, energy dynamics, and the effects of fisheries interactions on bonefish in The Bahamas and Puerto Rico. Bonefish are prevalent throughout the tropics and sub-tropics worldwide, and are a highly popular sport fish that generates significant revenue for many local economies. Jake’s primary goal is to determine bonefish behaviours (i.e. resting, swimming, feeding) and energy usage in multiple environments to assess how bonefish utilize different habitats. He is also examining fine scale habitat use of bonefish in Puerto Rico to assess daily and seasonal patterns of movement and important habitat characteristics for bonefish. Additionally, he is quantifying the effects of a common stressor, catch-and-release angling, on bonefish behaviour and survival, as well as testing methods for facilitating recovery after angling to improve post-release survival from predation. Overall, Jake’s research aims to inform basic biology including foraging, movement, and life history theories, as well as applied conservation of bonefish populations and marine ecosystems.

 

Contact: jbrownsc@connect.carleton.ca